UK drone near misses on course to more than double this year

 

With the continuing growth of drone technology usage one of the major concerns surrounding such increased usage has been that of near misses between drones and manned aircraft. This has recently received substantial publicity, with understandably the major fear being that a collision might in a worst case scenario lead to a manned aircraft being brought down.

The likelihood of this concern involving drones coming into conflict with manned aircraft receding appears extremely unlikely in the short term given the most recent information on near misses over UK skies. The latest data from the UK Airprox Board, the organisation which investigates near misses between aircraft in UK skies, shows that with less than half the year gone the number of reported near misses involving drones currently stands at 26, just 3 short of the 29 near misses reported in the whole of 2015. This points to the strong possibility of reported drone near misses doubling in comparison to last year.

The Airprox Board drone near miss database has the most recent near miss occurring on the 21st May, so it is reasonable to assume June reports have yet to be added to the database. By the end of May 2015 there had been a total of 7 reported near misses, with the remaining 22 occurring from June onwards. If that pattern were to be repeated this year then rather than the near misses doubling, we could see them in fact quadrupling.

The recently released full details of the Airprox Board’s April meeting which investigated 7 drone near misses occurring in February and March, shows that 3 of the 7, were classified by the Board as Category A, the highest risk category. As with all previous investigated near misses involving drones, none of the drone pilots could be identified. Full details of the Airprox Board’s May meeting have yet to be released, although some details are available on the Board’s drone database. This shows that at May’s meeting a further 8 near misses were looked into, and 4 of these were recorded as Category A.

The continuing inability of the authorities to identify drones flying in close proximity to manned aircraft is clearly one of the key reasons why the numbers of such incidents continue to grow. The government were very keen to emphasise that the recent report instigated by the police on Twitter that a drone had actually hit a BA aircraft was likely to have been false; the reason being, the media frenzy that ensued was such that if the report had been found to be correct the pressure on the government to act could have become overwhelming and led to them introducing regulations that they would fear could impact on the development of drone technology and usage. The UK government will be including in a new Transport Act of Parliament new rules relating to drone use, but no doubt these will be measured; they do not want to be pressured into what they and commercial drone operators may consider as burdensome regulation.

 

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